Author: connecticutforsocialchange

Connecticut approves 1st African-American chief justice

By SUSAN HAIGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS In a historic vote, Connecticut lawmakers unanimously confirmed Associate Justice Richard Robinson as the next chief justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court. He becomes the first African-American to hold the judicial branch’s top job. The Senate on Thursday voted 36-0 in favor of Robinson’s nomination, with one top Republican lauding him as “a man of the people” who has remained grounded while having a “stellar career” as an attorney, superior court judge, and associate justice. The House of Representatives unanimously approved Robinson’s nomination on Monday. Robinson, 60, was Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s second chief justice nominee...

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Punishment & Racial Bias In Schools: One mom’s story of fighting for her son’s rights and education

Kia Levey Burden has an important story to tell about fighting for her son’s needs at school. Professionally, Kia has spent her career advocating for children and families facing barriers created by institutional bias and racism. She is a professor of Social Work at Southern Connecticut State University, works with the Center for Children’s Advocacy, is an Equity Fellow at the Graustein Memorial Fund and is President of Launch Consulting. None of her degrees or extensive work experience fully prepared her to deal with the patterns of unjust, racially biased treatment and suspensions of her young black son, Seth....

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Connecticut Social Movements

Throughout state history, everyday people have banded together on local and national issues to defy the status quo and call for change. The causes have been diverse, from anti-slavery, temperance, and universal suffrage to the Good Roads movement championed by Hartford bicycle innovator Albert Pope in the late 1800s. Often the struggle is long, as witnessed by indigenous groups’ quest for recognition and land rights. And sometimes it is violent, as seen in the Hartford and New Haven riots of the Civil Rights era. Noted Connecticut reformers include abolitionist Roger Sherman Baldwin, who defended the Amistad captives, and Estelle Griswold, who, in the 1960s, challenged the state’s...

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STUDY: Women of Color Living in Poverty Face Highest Risk of Eviction

A new report from Eviction Lab explores who is experiencing housing insecurity in the United States. Nearly one million American households received eviction notices in 2016, according to newly released data from a team of Princeton University researchers at Eviction Lab. On Saturday (April 7), The New York Times reported on the research, which examines 83 million eviction records that demonstrate widespread housing insecurity in both urban and rural locales around the country. The article spotlights Richmond, Virginia—the city with the second highest eviction rate in the nation—where eviction judgments are far more common in areas where people of color live than they are in predominantly White neighborhoods....

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Screening: Milwaukee 53206

Wednesday, April 11, 2018 – 6:00pm to 8:00pm Yale Law School, Levinson Auditorium see map  127 Wall Street New Haven, CT 06511 Sponsored by RITM MILWAUKEE 53206 chronicles the lives of those living in the ZIP code that incarcerates the highest percentage of black men in America, up to 62%. Through the intimate stories of three 53206 residents, we witness the high toll that excessive jail sentencing takes on individuals and families that make up the community. The film examines Milwaukee’s ZIP code 53206 to illuminate the story of people from across the United States who live with the daily effects of unjust and long...

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